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first_imgNaomi Campbell is set to host the amfAR Inspiration Gala São Paulo on April 4.Inspiration São Paulo is the largest Inspiration Series event held outside of the United States and one of the most anticipated philanthropic and social events in South America. This year marks the fourth annual Inspiration Gala São Paulo and the third year that it will be held at the breathtaking home of Honorary Chair Dinho Diniz.This year’s event will honor Janet Jackson, and Co-Chairs for the event include Sharon Stone, Kenneth Cole and Kate Moss.Since its inception in 2010, Inspiration galas have been held in New York, Los Angeles, Paris, São Paulo, Rio de Janeiro, Toronto, and Miami. Each year features a different design “Inspiration” theme. Past events have featured incredible performances by top recording artists such as Gilberto Gil, Jennifer Hudson, Liza Minnelli, Debbie Harry, Preta Gil, Ana Carolina, Courtney Love, Dita Von Teese, Cyndi Lauper, Seu Jorge, and Katy Perry.Participants and honorees have included Sandra Bullock, Sofia Coppola, Francisco Costa, Alan Cumming, Claire Danes, Marc Jacobs, Jennifer Lopez, Kate Moss, Sarah Jessica Parker, Pelé, amfAR Global Fundraising Chairman Sharon Stone, and Hilary Swank. To date, the Inspiration Series has raised more than $10 million to benefit amfAR.Find out more here.last_img read more

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first_imgThe GRAMMY Foundation announced today that five students will receive financial assistance for GRAMMY Camp through the generous support of the Bruno Mars Scholarship Fund.The scholarship fund was established through a grant from the Hawai’i Community Foundation at the recommendation of Bruno Mars. The fund will cover the tuition of one qualified high school student each year for the next five years with preference to students from Hawai’i. GRAMMY Camp, now celebrating its 10th year, is the GRAMMY Foundation’s signature music industry camp for U.S. high school students.To be eligible, U.S. high school applicants must complete an online application, video audition and a financial assistance form at www.grammyintheschools.com. The deadline to apply is March 31, 2014. The scholarship recipient will be notified in May 2014. Through the support of several corporate and individual donors, approximately 75 percent of GRAMMY Camp participants who applied for financial aid have received assistance from the GRAMMY Foundation. This program is supported in part by Converse and Journeys.“Over the past 10 years, GRAMMY Camp has emerged as one of the most interactive and immersive training grounds for young people interested in a range of careers in the music industry,” said Neil Portnow, President/CEO of The Recording Academy and the GRAMMY Foundation. “The program’s success has inspired us to offer a new residential GRAMMY Camp this summer in St. Paul at McNally Smith College of Music, and a new nonresidential version of GRAMMY Camp in Nashville at Belmont University, in addition to our traditional locations in Los Angeles at the University of Southern California Thornton School of Music, and in Brooklyn at Converse Rubber Tracks. Frankly, there are no limits on how far we can take GRAMMY Camp given our goal to foster the next generations of music makers.”GRAMMY Camp offers selected high school students an interactive residential summer music experience. Focusing on all aspects of commercial music, this unique opportunity provides instruction by industry professionals in an immersive creative environment with cutting-edge technology in professional facilities. The program offers seven music career tracks: Audio Engineering; Electronic Music Production; Music Business; Music Journalism; a Performance track for Bass, Drums, Guitar, Keyboard, Vocal, and Winds & Strings; Video Production; and Songwriting. This real-world, hands-on environment will involve an in-depth look at the entire creative process from the first spark of original material through the promotion of a finished product, and will culminate in a launch party.Source:PR Newswirelast_img read more

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first_imgPaul, Stella and Mary McCartney have joined with Rt Hon Gregory Barker MP, former Minister of State for Energy and Climate Change and now Climate Advisor to David Cameron, to launch an online campaign to encourage people to skip meat one day a week in order to reduce their carbon footprint and help tackle climate change.Video: Paul McCartney supports Meat Free Monday’s Climate PledgeThe Meat Free Monday Climate Pledge campaign (#MFMclimatepledge) will run during the build up to the UN Climate Summit that is taking place in New York later this month.UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon is gathering together global leaders on 23 September – the first time Heads of State will have come together to discuss climate change since Copenhagen in 2009. The summit is being held to jump-start the climate negotiations that are due to conclude with an ambitious global treaty in December 2015. To help build momentum Ban Ki-moon is looking for “bold commitments and actions that will catalyse transformative change”.The McCartney family and Greg Barker are therefore putting a simple but effective idea on the table: a weekly meat-free day. Over the next two weeks, they will be encouraging people from all over to visit pledge.meatfreemondays.com, pledge to go meat free for one day a week and share the idea with others, before Greg Barker then presents the final results of the campaign at the Summit in New York.The launch, held at vegetarian restaurant tibits in Mayfair, was attended by environmental NGO leaders and a host of supporters including Chrissie Hynde and Victoria Pendleton. During a delicious Meat Free Brunch, Friends of the Earth, Greenpeace, WWF, Global Action Plan, Sustainability Hub and the Eating Better alliance came together to back the campaign and committed to encouraging their members and supporters to get involved too.Greg Barker, who has personally supported Meat Free Monday since the start of the year said: “Giving up meat one day a week is more than just a symbolic act and, if enough of us do it, will send a very powerful and loud message to world leaders. Meat production is an increasingly large contributor to dangerous climate change so coming together like this may have a small but very real impact.”Paul McCartney added: “Going meat free one day a week is a simple way to contribute to a more sustainable future. Please pledge your support at pledge.meatfreemondays.com and encourage world leaders to back this in order to help fight climate change.”Meat production is responsible for 14.5 per cent of global greenhouse gas emissions, according to the United Nations Food and Agricultural Organization, with some scientists saying the percentage is higher. It also requires increasingly unsustainable levels of precious resources (land, water and energy) and is a major contributor towards global environmental degradation and climate change.A weekly meat free day is a simple but significant action that everyone can take to cut global emissions. And, with diet-related diseases on the rise, an increased consumption of plant-based food has the added benefit of improved health and could potentially help reduce healthcare costs in the long term.The Meat Free Monday concept is gaining popularity and similar initiatives have already been embraced by a growing movement of chefs, schools, businesses, politicians and communities in 36 countries. Sid Lerner, founder of Meatless Monday in the States, welcomes the launch of the Meat Free Monday pledge drive during a time when world attention will be focused on the threat of climate change: “Meatless Monday, and the many home-grown variations in 22 languages around the world, are shining examples of grassroots, citizen-led campaigns that collectively are making an enormous impact by encouraging simple changes to our diet.”To get involved, visit pledge.meatfreemondays.com, pledge to go meat free for one day a week and share the idea with others.Source:Meat Free Mondayslast_img read more

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first_imgThe International Myeloma Foundation (IMF) – improving the quality of life of myeloma patients while working toward prevention and a cure – is pleased to announce Takeda Oncology’s initiative this month to raise funds for IMF myeloma research and advocacy.In concert with the IMF’s March Myeloma ACTION Month campaign, Takeda Oncology is putting a musical spin on fundraising with “Music 2 Fight Myeloma,” which pairs the power of music with the impact of social media.During the IMF’s “Myeloma ACTION Month,” Takeda Oncology will make a donation to the IMF for each person who follows the “Music 2 Fight Myeloma” playlist on Spotify, the digital music service.“The IMF is proud to partner with Takeda Oncology during ‘Myeloma ACTION Month’ to raise awareness and support research to find a cure,” said IMF President and Co-Founder Susie Novis Durie. “Music is very emotional, it soothes, it’s uplifting, and it transcends barriers, bringing people together. I know from personal experience the powerful role music can play in helping people through tough times, especially myeloma patients and their loved ones.”Christina Aguilera’s “Fighter,” Katy Perry’s “Roar,” and Pharrell Williams’ “Happy” are among the songs selected by the myeloma patient community for the campaign’s playlist.“As part of Takeda’s commitment to the multiple myeloma community, we look for a variety of ways to support patients and caregivers,” said Liz Lewis, Patient Advocacy Head and Chief Counsel for Takeda’s Global Oncology Business Unit. “Takeda is proud to partner with the IMF and Spotify for the ‘Music 2 Fight Myeloma’ initiative to use the power of song to support and help raise awareness for individuals who are impacted by multiple myeloma.”Throughout the month of March, the IMF and Takeda Oncology will use social media to drive listeners to this playlist. Supporters can take part by signing up for Spotify for free and joining the fight with the spirit of music to increase awareness about multiple myeloma while also raising funds dedicated to preventing and finding a cure for the disease.last_img read more

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first_imgOn the 150th anniversary of Memorial Day, PBS’ multi award-winning NATIONAL MEMORIAL DAY CONCERT returns live from the West Lawn of the U.S. Capitol hosted by Tony Award-winner Joe Mantegna and Emmy Award-winner Gary Sinise.The 29th annual broadcast of the NATIONAL MEMORIAL DAY CONCERT airs live on PBS Sunday, May 27, 2018, from 8:00 to 9:30 p.m., before a concert audience of hundreds of thousands, millions more at home, as well as to our troops serving around the world on the American Forces Network.An annual tradition unlike anything else on television, America’s national night of remembrance takes us back to the real meaning of the holiday through personal stories interwoven with musical performances. This year’s program features the following stories: The show will recognize the story of two buddies – Joe Annello and Hiroshi “Hershey” Miyamura – friends for over 68 years, who helped each other survive deadly combat during the Korean War, endured the unimaginable as POWs, and became American heroes – one receiving the Silver Star and the other the Medal of Honor. This national moment of remembrance will recognize our Korean War veterans with performances by Emmy, Golden Globe and SAG Award-nominated actor John Corbett (MY BIG FAT GREEK WEDDING) and star of CHICAGO MED Brian Tee. 2018 marks the 150th anniversary of Memorial Day, originally known as Decoration Day and first commemorated at Arlington National Cemetery.The all-star line-up also features distinguished American leader General Colin L. Powell USA (Ret.) and musical performances by actor and country singer Charles Esten (NASHVILLE); Tony, Grammy and Emmy Award-winning actress and singer Cynthia Erivo (THE COLOR PURPLE); three-time Grammy Award-nominee singer/songwriter Leona Lewis; Tony-nominee and star of NBC’s hit TV show SMASH, Broadway and TV’s Megan Hilty; acclaimed tenor and Broadway star Alfie Boe (LES MISÉRABLES); and Gary Sinise & The Lt. Dan Band, marking 15 years and over 400 concerts entertaining our troops, veterans and military families; in performance with the National Symphony Orchestra under the direction of top pops conductor Jack Everly. Stay tuned for an additional talent announcement coming soon.The concert will also be live-streamed on PBS, You Tube, Facebook and www.pbs.org/national-memorial-day-concert and available as Video on Demand, May 28 to June 10, 2018. Women have served our nation in times of war and peace since our country’s founding – even before they were officially allowed to enlist. To mark the 70th anniversary of the Women’s Armed Services Integration Act, the concert will pay tribute to the contributions of women in our military throughout history, including the story of Silver Star recipient Leigh Ann Hester, the 1st woman to receive the Silver Star for combat. The segment will conclude by honoring women representing generations of service since WWII from the 5 branches of the military on stage. Academy Award, Golden Globe and Emmy Award-winning actress Allison Janney (I, TONYA, MOM, THE WEST WING) and Tony-nominated actress and star of TV’s FALLING WATER, THE WEST WING and LOADED, Mary McCormack will participate in this segment.center_img This year also marks the 50th anniversary of the Battle of Khe Sanh, one of the fiercest battles of the Vietnam War. The show will feature the story of Purple Heart recipient Bill Rider, who was part of the battalion known as “The Walking Dead.” Bill’s story will focus on his return home to fight a different war…that of post-traumatic stress. As part of his healing process, Bill found a way to pay it forward by dedicating his life to helping generations of service men and women who have experienced the trauma of war. Bill’s story will be told by Academy Award-nominated actor Graham Greene (DANCES WITH WOLVES, WIND RIVER).last_img read more

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first_imgMusic mogul Simon Cowell is supporting animal charity Humane Society International’s bid to close down a dog meat farm in South Korea and rescue the more than 200 dogs and puppies caged inside who would otherwise be killed and eaten.The dogs spend their entire lives in small, barren metal cages but HSI, which has so far permanently closed down twelve dog meat farms and saved nearly 1,400 dogs, are desperate to close it with Simon’s help.Eating dog meat is fast declining in popularity in South Korea particularly among younger consumers. However, thousands of dog factory farms still exist, breeding around 2.5 million dogs a year for human consumption. Humane Society International works with dog meat farmers who want to leave the dying industry, and helps them switch to more humane alternative livelihoods such as mushroom or chili growing. The charity hopes its successful model will encourage the Korean government to adopt the phase-out plan and expand it nationwide to end the industry for good.This isn’t the first time Simon Cowell has supported HSI’s #EndDogMeat campaign. Last year he gave an exclusive interview to Good Morning Britain on the eve of HSI’s rescue team setting off for Seoul on another rescue mission. He was incredibly moved by the plight of dogs suffering on the farms, and pledged to help directly to bring more dogs to safety.Simon told GMB’s Pip Tomson: “It’s like eating your friend. It’s the fact you’re eating such a kind, helpless, sweet animal.”And Simon’s sentiments are increasingly echoed by campaigners in South Korea who are vociferously opposing killing dogs for meat. In July a petition on the government’s website calling for an end to the trade was signed by more than 200,000 people and prompted an official response from the President’s office. The government pledged to consider removing dogs from the legal definition of livestock, a move that could make a significant dent in the brutal industry.Humane Society International hopes to deploy a rescue team as early as next week to start closing the farm. Most of the dogs will fly to Canada to be cared for at HSI’s shelter there, but the charity also hopes to be able to bring a small number to the UK to look for forever homes.HSI UK Executive Director Claire Bass says: “Simon’s generous donation means the world to us, and provides a huge boost to our appeal to close this horrendous dog meat farm. More than 200 dogs are languishing in the most appalling conditions, but we have a real chance to save them. With every dog farm we close and every farmer we help switch to a more profitable, humane business, we’re showing the South Korean government that it’s possible to end this cruel trade. These poor dogs have had the worst lives so far, so we’re desperate to get them out of those dreadful cages and show them love, soft beds and loving arms for the first time in their lives.”last_img read more

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first_img LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Facebook Advertisement *** Warning: This article contains major spoilers for the Killjoys episode “Full Metal Monk” ***Well things certainly got dark on Killjoys this week didn’t they? Raise your hand if you kept thinking John (Aaron Ashmore) and Pawter (Sarah Power) were going to snap out of their drugged state and put a stop to Jelco (Pascal Langdale) and his plans. Unfortunately, they did not and things look bleaker than ever for the Westerlyns in Old Town. Will Dutch (Hannah John-Kamen) and D’avin (Luke Macfarlane) be able to break through the wall and get to John and Pawter before anything seriously bad happens to them? She already seems to have her hands pretty full as she traveled back to Arkyn this week and learned more information about Khlyen (Rob Stewart) and Aneela.Just how bad will things get before they start to get better? What kind of trouble does Jelco and Delle Seyah (Mayko Nguyen) have planned? Killjoys creator and showrunner Michelle Lovretta joins The TV Junkies for her weekly postmortem chat to provide the answers to some of these questions. Read on below as she breaks down “Full Metal Monk,” written by Sean Reycraft and directed by Paolo Barzman. The TV Junkies: So you weren’t kidding about things getting dark these last few episodes. We learned the Company is making people in Westerly into “helpless, happy drones,” and worse yet, John and Pawter are trapped there. What is Dutch going to do about that?Michelle Lovretta: She’s going to mama-bear it and get her ass to Old Town to rescue her boy, but the results of that rescue op won’t be the easy reunion Dutch expects. When we pick things up in 209 she’ll be in a hell of a predicament. They *all* will, actually…TTVJ: Jelco alluded to the company’s poisoning of the rations being “about so much more than that.” Any hints as to what else he and Delle Seyah have planned?ML: The full answers to that are the beating, bloody heart of 209. You know, I thought Pascal did a fabulous job making Jelco a believable yet compelling threat in his earlier eps–but nothing beats peeling back his layers in 208 and seeing what a truly complex sadist he can be. So if you love-to-hate Jelco like I do, stay tuned–Delle Seyah and Jelco have even bigger parts to play in 209, in terms of their impact on our Killjoys and the pieces of the larger, ongoing puzzle that they will help us reveal in that episode. It’s good stuff. Login/Register With: Advertisement Advertisement Twitterlast_img read more

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first_imgAPTN National NewsEDMONTON–An Alberta judge has ruled that the Metis have no Aboriginal rights in the southern part of the province.Provincial court Judge Ted Fisher made the ruling when he found Metis Hunter Gary Hirsekorn guilty of hunting out of seasons and of illegal possession of wildlife. Hirsekorn was fined $350 on each count.Fisher ruled that the Metis did not have Aboriginal rights because the Blackfoot had prevented the Metis from entering southern Alberta before 1874.The Metis managed to finally settle the area after the Canadian government removed the Blackfoot threat, the judge ruled.The 14-month case was triggered by the Metis Nation of Alberta who hoped to affirm their right to subsistence hunt.Two Metis hunters illegally shot an antelope and mule deer on purpose in hopes of forcing the court case. One of the hunters has since died.Ron Jones and his common law wife, died this past October.last_img read more

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first_imgJorge Barrera APTN National News OTTAWA—Prime Minister Stephen Harper defended his refusal to call a public inquiry into the high number of murdered and missing Indigenous women Thursday by using talking points undercut by a report released on the issue earlier in the day.Harper said during question period his government was countering violence against Indigenous women by “cracking down on violent crime,” funding shelters and family violence prevention programs, along “dedicated RCMP project teams,” the creation of a centre for missing persons and passage of the Family Homes on Reserves and Matrimonial Interests or Rights Act.“Now is the time for action, not more NDP studies,” said Harper, who was responding to a question from Nova Scotia NDP MP Meagan Leslie, who led off question period for her party.Harper is personally against a public inquiry and has told two successive Assembly First Nations national chiefs that his government would not be calling one. Harper has said the issue isn’t a priority for the government and that he doesn’t believe violence against Indigenous women is a sociological phenomenon.Harper’s answer in question period, also echoed in responses from Status of Women Minister Kellie Leitch and Aboriginal Affairs Minister Bernard Valcourt, justifying the government’s position was dissected by a report released Thursday morning.Harper emphasized his government’s anti-crime stand as being the “first and foremost” way to counter violence against Indigenous women.The report, by the Legal Strategy Coalition on Violence Against Indigenous Women (LSC), was based on a review of 58 studies on the issue and it found a consensus that the only way to stem the violence was to target its root causes, not by simply crime-fighting.“The existing literature does not support the government’s stance,” said the LSC report.The report found that the 58 studies made over 700 recommendations and most of them were about preventative actions.In his answer, Harper also highlighted the funding of shelters as part of his government’s “multi-pronged” action plan to counter the violence.Yet, funding for 41 on-reserve shelters has remained about the same since 2010-2011 at about $23 million, with about $3.5 million going to reimburse territorial and provincial governments.Harper also referred to RCMP teams dedicated to historical unsolved murders and missing person cases. One of the most prominent of these RCMP teams from British Columbia was forced to cut resources to its E-PANA program late last year as a result of a $1.4 million budget cut to its major crime unit. E-PANA was created in 2006 to investigate unsolved murders of women from the “Highway of Tears” in northern B.C.Harper’s answer also highlighted the RCMP’s new missing persons centre, which includes a DNA bank. The centre, however, does not have a focus Indigenous women.The LSC report found that the Harper government has no interest in supporting focused programs on Indigenous women.“Our research has shown that the federal government has dramatically cut funding to Indigenous-led organizations providing services to Indigenous communities and Indigenous women in particular,” said the report. “These organizations delivered preventative programs aimed at alleviating poverty and minimizing the social and economic marginalization of Indigenous women as well as services designed to protect, heal and support women and girls who had experienced violence.”Harper’s answer also mentioned the recently passed matrimonial property legislation.The report found that the legislation “does not properly address the complicated issues associated with on-reserve marital rights and that there is no plan for how to ensure women can enforce their rights,” said the report.One of the co-authors of the report, Pippa Feinstein, said Harper and his cabinet ministers resort to “myopic” arguments to defend their opposition to an inquiry that ignores “Canadian colonialism.” Feinstein said Harper’s use of the matrimonial property legislation as to reinforce the government’s position is all about spin.“That argument really relates to Indigenous women on-reserves, it neglects all the Indigenous women who live in urban centres who are disproportionately impacted by violence, and Inuit and Metis women,” said Feinstein. “It is another example of how myopic and strategically scoped their argument is.”jbarrera@aptn.ca@JorgeBarreralast_img read more

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first_imgJorge Barrera APTN National NewsPrime Minister Stephen Harper’s government tabled its final budget before the next federal election Tuesday and if the document is designed to attract support at the ballot box to keep the current administration in power it’s clear First Nation people do not rank anywhere among the Conservative’s target voter groups.Finance Minister Joe Oliver didn’t mention the word “Aboriginal” or “First Nation” in his budget speech delivered in the House of Commons Tuesday.The 2015-2016 federal budget projects a razor-thin $1.4 billion surplus, which is the centre-piece of the document as the Harper government hopes to convince voters it is best positioned of all federal parties to manage the country’s finances wisely.“Opportunity is what has drawn people here from around the world, generation after generation. It is what draws them still,” said Oliver, in his budget speech. “I will be forever grateful to my grandparents for their fateful decision to immigrate to Canada more than a hundred years ago.”Yet, for those who trace their ancestry to a time long before Canada became a country, there was little of note in the budget.The majority of measures announced specifically for First Nations, Inuit and Metis people are simply the continuation of money announced in previous budgets.On First Nation education, the Harper government simply recycled a small portion of the $1.9 billion announced in last year’s budget as part of the package that was to accompany proposed legislation governing on-reserve education. When the First Nation chiefs turned against the proposed First Nation Control of First Nation Education Act, the Harper government said it would put the money on ice until it got the legislative changes it wanted.The federal government sliced off bits of that money and put it into the 2015-2016 federal budget. The $200 million over five years unveiled in the budget to “improve First Nations education” is drawn partly from the $160 million the federal government set aside last year to help First Nation communities prepare for the proposed legislation’s implementation. The money breaks down to an additional $40 million a year for First Nation education across the country.The budget also re-announces the $500 million over six years for on-reserve schools announced last November as part of the federal government’s $5.8 billion infrastructure package.A federal official said, on background, that $1.2 billion of the money announced in 2014 still remains set-aside in the fiscal framework for First Nation education. The budget document, however, doesn’t mention the amount, meaning it has not set plans yet to use the money.The other big dollar amount item in the 2015-2016 budget deals with a $215 million investment over five years for “Aboriginal labour market programming.” In addition, the budget earmarks $33.5 million over the same time span for “Administrative support” for the program. The money will also be used for an on-reserve pilot labour force survey to “improve available labour market information.”The bulk of this new training money is a continuation of the $210 million, also spread over five years, announced in 2010, for project-specific training.The money comes in addition to the $350 million a year Ottawa provides in training for its Aboriginal Skills and Employment Training Strategy.The budget also sets aside $12 million over three years, or $4 million a year, for the Indspire scholarship and bursaries for First Nation and Inuit students. The money follows a similar investment from 2013.The budget invests $30.3 million over five years, roughly $6 million a year, for bands admitted under the First Nations Land Management Act. The Act gives bands the ability to set laws governing their lands. The 2013 budget put $9 million over two years toward the land regime. The continuation of funding is expected to accommodate about 25 First Nations which are expected to come under the regime. There are currently 94 First Nations which have been accepted under the Act.First Nation mental health services also get a $2 million in ongoing funding beginning in 2016-2017.The budget will continue to fund on-reserve and off-reserve surveys targeting First Nation, Inuit and Metis people with $33.2 million over the next five years, $22.3 million coming from the existing budgets of Aboriginal Affairs, Health Canada and Employment and Social Development Canada. The next survey is expected to range from 2016-2017 to 2020-2021 and focus on “participation in the economy.”The budget sets aside $5.7 million over five years to help the sealing industry, in which the Inuit are involved, market its products.The 2015-2016 budget says the federal government plans to introduce amendments to the First Nations Fiscal Management Act. The amendments are expected to improve the ability of First Nations to pool their resources and issue bonds for infrastructure projects.The budget document says Ottawa is interested in helping First Nation communities develop regimes to tax people living on their territories.Ottawa currently has 35 sales tax arrangements allowing Indian Act bands and self-government First Nations to levy sales taxes within their territories. Ottawa also has 14 arrangements allowing self-government First Nation communities to impose income taxes on all people living on settlement lands.jbarrera@aptn.ca@JorgeBarreralast_img read more

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first_imgAPTN National NewsThe commissioners in charge of leading the national inquiry into missing and murdered Indigenous women start their work in September.They’re tasked with getting to the root of the disproportionate number of Indigenous women who are either murdered or go missing in Canada.In the lead up to the commission’s work, APTN is taking a look back at some of the stories we’ve reported on – stories as they originally aired.In this report, three families  in Saskatchewan explain how they tried to get help from police to find their missing loved ones.This story originally aired in 2001. The reporter was Vera Houle.last_img read more

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first_imgAPTN NewsA poll released Monday on the 10th anniversary of Canada’s apology for residential schools, shows Canadians have strong and divided feelings about many areas including treaties, government attention to Indigenous issues, and funding of them.Angus Reid surveyed 2,500 people and found more people believe Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is paying “too much” attention to Indigenous issues, rather than “too little”.And while most Canadians agree that the attention and money currently being devoted to Indigenous issues in Canada is not particularly effective, they vary wildly in their perspectives about how to change this status quo.More Key Findings:Despite the deep divides in some areas, 61 per cent of respondents say they have optimism about the future of the relationship between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Canadians.The poll results can be viewed here www.angusreid.orgnews@aptn.ca@aptnnewslast_img read more

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first_img(Bobby Cameron is seeking another three-year term as head of the Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations. He won’t comment on recent stories coming from inside the organization.)Kathleen MartensAPTN NewsFinancial staff have been bullied after a long-time employee was filmed using a shredding machine inside the Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations (FSIN) this week, a lawyer for the organization said.The video was posted on Facebook.Victor Carter said the video was taken without consent Wednesday and shared online.He said it led to “additional scrutiny and bullying” of staff members.“Just following directions from the chief,” a woman is heard saying on the fuzzy video shared with APTN News.Carter said the voice belongs to the person who filmed the video.And the FSIN is taking “legal action” against them.“Legal action is being taken against the person who shot the video and the people who posted it online defaming the institution and the employee in the video,” said Vice Chief David Pratt in a statement on Friday.“The safety and privacy of our staff is paramount in our daily operations and this person deliberately put our employees at risk and violated their personal space and privacy,” said Pratt“Our business operates like others and shredding confidential documents is the norm for daily and weekly operations.  We want to clarify and confirm that the FSIN is not under criminal investigation and business continues as usual.”FSIN sent new, at times conflicting, information to APTN via email about what transpired during the first week of a month-long election period for a new chief, first vice chief and third vice chief.“The video was taken Wednesday the cops came to FSIN on Monday. No police were involved with FSIN on the date the video was taken,” Carter said.A Saskatoon police spokeswoman told APTN officers responded to a call of “a disturbance” on Sept. 24 but no charges were laid.Julie Clark said officers remained on the scene.“We were called to a businesses in the 100 block of Packham Ave. at about 1:20pm on Monday in regard to a disturbance,” she said in an email.“There were no criminal charges and our officers were there to keep the peace during an internal dispute.”Clayton Tootoosis, a former FSIN youth representative who posted the video to his Facebook page, was not at the office when the police arrived or when the video was taken but said, as a former FSIN representative, he still knows people working at the offices.Tootoosis has since taken the video off his Facebook page.A source said the dispute occurred when Kim Jonathan, who was first vice chief, said she should be interim chief during the election period but had instead been locked out of the office and her email privileges suspended in a story first reported by the Saskatoon Star Phoenix.FSIN appointed fourth vice-chief Heather Bear interim chief instead but by Sept. 26 had removed that title.In a statement that day, FSIN’s joint-Indian government commission and executive council said executive operating officer, Dawn Walker, would be in charge instead.“As our top executive officer Dawn maintains administrative duties. The elected Executive members If FSIN are still in charger FSIN as they are also Directors of our corporate body.”The commission also said no interim chief would be appointed at this time.A source said Jonathan, who is not standing for re-election, filed a complaint with police about alleged financial improprieties at FSIN.But Saskatoon police were unable to confirm that.“We can’t provide a comment on that at this time,” Clark said.Tootoosis said the drama was “shameful” behaviour for an organization formed to champion and protect treaty rights.“All we can do from the outside is watch it crumble under its own weight,” he said via phone from Saskatoon.“It’s on a path leading to its own self destruction.”The FSIN represents 74 First Nations in Saskatchewan with funding provided by the federal government.Members will elect a new chief, first vice-chief and third vice-chief on Oct. 25.Jonathan did not respond to a request for an interview.Two FSIN youth representatives issued their own media release on FSIN letterhead Sept. 26.Darian Lonechild and Rollin Baldhead said involving the police was “unacceptable” and set a bad example.“For years the productivity and governance of FSIN has been in question,” they said in the statement.“We must come together to restructure our nationhood and to be a more effective organization.”Incumbent FSIN chief Bobby Cameron is seeking another three-year term.He declined to comment when reached by phone.His challenger Delbert Wapass said he would call APTN back but didn’t.APTN contacted all seven candidates running for the three positions.Corey Bugler, in the race for third vice-chief, said he didn’t know what was happening at FSIN.“I kind of heard something, but I don’t listen to hearsay,” he said.Darin Poorman, running for first vice-chief, was confident FSIN was handling the internal strife.“We have our own organization dealing with it,” he said in a telephone interview.“We have our own code of conduct. Nothing has been made public.”Poorman and Bugler said they had not seen the video.kmartens@aptn.ca@katmartelast_img read more

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first_imgTina HouseAPTN NewsSince former justice minister and attorney general Jody Wilson-Raybould testified earlier this week, there has been an outpouring of support for her.That includes in Vancouver where chiefs and political leaders came together to share their thoughts on the events that shook federal politics in Canada.“I think our ancestors are smiling with us,” said Acqueline Thomas from Saik’uz First Nation in B.C. “I really believe that she showed the country the true strength of Aboriginal people especially Aboriginal women.”Wilson-Raybould testified on Wednesday before the justice committee to talk about, what she called, political pressure to intervene in the criminal case of Quebec engineering giant SNC-Lavalin.Wilson-Raybould says her experiences as an Indigenous person and the values she was raised with are what drove her to challenge the highest echelons of power in Canada.“The history of Crown-Indigenous relations in this country includes a history of the rule of law not being respected,” she said.The former justice minister and attorney general testified Wednesday that she came under relentless pressure — including veiled threats — from Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, his senior staff, the top public servant and Finance Minister Bill Morneau’s office to halt a criminal prosecution of Montreal engineering giant SNC-Lavalin.And she says she believes she was shuffled out of the prestigious justice portfolio to veterans affairs in January because she refused to give in to it.Wilson-Raybould made the stunning and detailed accusations in testimony Wednesday before the House of Commons justice committee, breaking three weeks of silence on the affair that has rocked the government, prompting her resignation from cabinet and the departure of Gerald Butts, Trudeau’s most trusted adviser.Support for Wilson-Raybould in political circles is mixedCanada’s former justice minister could have been more flexible in her decision-making process, says the co-chair of the Liberal Indigenous Caucus.Robert Falcon-Ouellette, the Liberal MP for Winnipeg Centre, says what Canadians saw from Jody Wilson-Raybould’s explosive testimony Wednesday was a peek behind the parliamentary curtain.“What we saw yesterday was us learning and watching not only how sausage was made but also seeing a slaughterhouse and how decisions are come by,” he told APTN News.“And it’s not a pretty process.”Falcon-Ouellette is one of nine members of the caucus. APTN asked all of them for comment.He said it sounded like the former attorney general became entrenched in her position instead of absorbing new information from Justin Trudeau and others as it became available.“The problem in politics is often sometimes people make a decision and they think no matter what happens they have to stick and be immobile and never make a change,” he said in an interview.Falcon-Ouellette said he believes what both politicians have to say about the SNC-Lavalin affair.“I’ve met the prime minister, too. I’ve heard his version of the facts,” he said.“He was working to make sure that all perspectives are looked at on an issue.”Don Rusnak, former chair of the Liberal Indigenous Caucus, also comes down squarely in the middle.Robert Falcon-Ouellette (APTN File)“It is unfortunate that Ms. Wilson-Raybould felt pressured in her role as Attorney General,” the Thunder Bay-Rainy River MP said in an emailed statement.“At the same time, the Prime Minister has been clear that he and his staff always acted appropriately and according to all the rules. It is normal for the government to have discussions about potential jobs losses and to be focused on growing the economy.”Rusnak, now parliamentary secretary to the minister of Indigenous services, sees “growth and change” coming out of the situation.Specifically, whether the roles of attorney general and minister of justice should be separated.“I agree with this,” added the lawyer, who declined to say whether Wilson-Raybould should quit the Liberal caucus.Meanwhile, Indigenous leaders expressed solidarity behind Wilson-Raybould.One Manitoba chief saw parallels between the way the B.C. MP withstood “sustained pressure” and how Elijah Harper shut down the Meech Lake Accord in 1990.Harper, a former MLA, MP and chief of a northern Manitoba First Nation, achieved national fame when he stood in the Manitoba legislature and refused to support the deal.“The truth-telling testimony of the former attorney general will be held up as one of those moments where Indigenous people stuck to their principles much to the same effect as Elijah Harper stood against his government,” said Garrison Settee, Manitoba Keewatinowi Okimakanak grand chief.In Saskatchewan, the Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations, applauded Wilson-Raybould’s “integrity and courage” in speaking out.“In our culture, matriarchs are the heart of our home fires and we wanted to thank her for everything she’s done to highlight the spirit and intent of our people,” FSIN Chief Bobby Cameron said in a release.Stuart Phillip, grand chief of the Union of B.C. Indian Chiefs, said Wilson-Raybould’s words grabbed attention across Canada.“To stand up to the power structure…she took down some of the sickest bullies in Ottawa,” he told APTN.“There’s a real buzz going on in our communities.”thouse@aptn.ca@inthehouse7-with files from Kathleen Martens, Martha Troian, and Justin Brakelast_img read more

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first_imgTORONTO – Centerra Gold Inc. has signed a friendly deal to buy AuRico Metals Inc. for $310 million in cash.Under the deal, Centerra (TSX:CG) has agreed to pay $1.80 per share for the company which is developing the Kemess property in B.C.Shares in AuRico (TSX:AMI) closed at $1.30 on the Toronto Stock Exchange on Monday.Centerra says the deal expands its existing development pipeline to include another low-cost de-risked brownfield development asset in the Kemess property.The deal requires approval by two-thirds of the votes cast at a special meeting of AuRico Metals shareholders as well as court and regulatory approvals.Directors and senior officers of AuRico Metals, in addition to Alamos Gold Inc., that collectively hold about a 11.4 per cent stake in AuRico have agreed to vote in favour of the proposed deal.last_img read more

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first_imgMONTREAL – Canada’s central bank is not worried that people will expect very low inflation to continue because it has repeatedly fallen short of the Bank of Canada’s two per cent target, governor Stephen Poloz said Tuesday.“As a central banker you always concern yourself with…the risk that expectations will gravitate towards the actual experience instead of to the target itself,” he told reporters after discussing inflation with a Montreal business audience.But he said there is no evidence of a “de-anchoring” of expectations, saying all of the bank’s surveys suggest a strong knowledge about the two per cent target established 25 years ago following a period of high and volatile inflation and interest rates.While the bank has an inflation target range of between one and three per cent, Poloz isn’t overly concerned if it dips below or rises above the midway point. He said many advanced economies have faced a similar trend.In a luncheon speech to CFA Montreal and the Montreal Council on Foreign Relations, Poloz said the fundamental drivers of supply and demand, as well as short-term factors, can explain the movement in prices and that the popular perception that inflation has become inexplicable is exaggerated.“In part this perception reflects a misunderstanding of the accuracy with which economists can predict inflation and a misunderstanding of the precision with which central banks can control it,” he told an audience of 1,000.Inflation in Canada slowed over the first half of this year and remained in the lower half of the Bank of Canada’s target range even as the economy grew quickly.However Poloz said that there have been a number of one-time factors including below-average food inflation and the Ontario government’s reduction in electricity prices that helped keep inflation in check.“The bottom line is that fundamental drivers of inflation, along with some special factors we can identify, can explain the recent behaviour of inflation reasonably well,” Poloz said. “Certainly the remaining shortfall is well within a reasonable margin of error.”Poloz also said there may also be some drag on inflation from globalization and digitalization, which the bank is studying.“Over time, as we accumulate data, we may be more able to identify and statistically quantify these effects,” he said.The Bank of Canada aims to keep inflation at two per cent by making changes to its key interest rate target. Poloz said it takes 18 to 24 months for a change in interest rate policy to have its full impact on inflation.In keeping the rate on hold last month, the Bank of Canada said less monetary policy stimulus will likely be required over time, but that it will be cautious in making future adjustments to the policy rate and be guided by the incoming economic data.“A lot of pieces need to fall into place before we can be certain that the economy has made it all the way home,” Poloz said Tuesday.While higher wages can add to inflationary pressure, Canada’s improving jobs picture hasn’t been accompanied by much increase in real wages. Youth participation rates are still low and many other people have found part-time work.“The trendline for wages has been quite low and the fact that we’ve got a perk up in the last datapoint is encouraging and you never know when it’s the beginning of an uptrend but we need more datapoints to be assured of that,” he said after the speech.Poloz also said the U.S. threat of killing NAFTA has created uncertainty that can affect company investment decisions.“We know from our survey that even though investment intentions are higher, they’re not as high as they would be without the uncertainty due to NAFTA.”— With files from Craig Wong in Ottawa.last_img read more

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first_imgVANCOUVER – The death of an ill senior who lived inside a 24-hour Tim Hortons is drawing new attention to Vancouver’s housing crisis and raising questions about health supports for homeless people.Friends say the man in his 70s, who they knew only as Ted, was a kind and easygoing guy who began sleeping, eating and spending all his time in the coffee shop about 10 years ago. He had cancer and appeared to be hallucinating the day before he died on May 31, said his friend John Bingham.“He looked pretty rough,” said Bingham, who sleeps outside the Tim Hortons, adding he had never seen Ted hallucinate in the decade he’d known him.“I think he was getting ready to go, to pass on. … He’s saying things that he never said before.”Staff at the Tim Hortons became concerned about the man’s health and called 911 for assistance, the company said in a statement. It’s reviewing the details of the incident, but restaurant owners and their teams have full discretion to take any steps necessary to help guests who need medical assistance, it said.“Like other members of the community, we were saddened to hear this news. The individual was a regular at the restaurant and will be missed,” the statement said.Two ambulances responded to a report of a cardiac arrest at the coffee shop at 4 a.m., said Amy Robertson, a communications officer with British Columbia Emergency Health Services. Paramedics performed CPR until 4:45 a.m., when he was transported to hospital in critical condition, she said.The BC Coroners Service said it was aware of a death involving a man who was transported to hospital after being found at a Tim Hortons. But it only investigates sudden and unexpected deaths, not those of natural causes.Ted was a retired low-wage worker who struggled to make ends meet on a basic government pension, said Judy Graves, an advocate for the homeless.“He was very, very poor. He couldn’t afford housing. He was, like most of us would be, afraid to go into the Downtown Eastside where most of the shelters are,” she said. “He decided to maintain his dignity by living as much as he possibly could at Tim Hortons.”It’s inexpensive to stay in 24-hour restaurants over long periods of time, and possible to blend in with other customers, which was important to him, she said.Graves said Ted’s cancer was terminal but the health care system isn’t set up to help the homeless. They have no home in which to recuperate after they’re discharged, she said.“I’m nothing but grateful to that Tim Hortons that they actually have let Ted rest there,” she said. “They definitely added to his survival. He would not have survived for so long had he been living outside.”Ted was a happy and funny person who loved coffee and cigarettes, and often chatted with customers who passed by his table, Bingham said.Bingham was sleeping outside when the paramedics arrived at 4 a.m. There was a lot of commotion, and he heard a paramedic say Ted had suffered a heart attack, but he decided against going inside to see his friend.“I just wanted to have a memory of him when he was still alive,” he said. “He was a good character. A good person. He was a grumpy-looking guy but he was a really good guy.”Bingham, 50, said he’s been sleeping outside the Tim Horton’s for 20 years. He urged people in Vancouver to show more empathy to the city’s homeless population.“They should know that they’re one paycheque away from being out here, too. They should put their brakes on and take a look at reality,” he said.“Because when it hits you, that’s when you realize, maybe you should have been different, maybe you should have done things different. But people don’t usually do that until it happens.”— Follow @ellekane on Twitter.last_img read more

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first_imgGALVESTON, Texas — Port officials say Galveston can expect to see double the number of Disney cruises sailing from the city on the Gulf of Mexico over the next five years.The Port of Galveston announced Thursday that Disney Cruise Line will expand its offerings from the city to 26 cruises a year by 2023. The Galveston County Daily News reports that the agreement guarantees the company will operate out of Galveston for the next 10 years.The deal comes a month after the port announced plans to develop a new $85 million cruise terminal with Miami-based Royal Caribbean Cruises Ltd.Port Director Rodger Rees says Disney cruises will get some of the open slots when the new terminal is completed in 2021. He says the company wanted to be first in line.___Information from: The Galveston County Daily News, http://www.galvnews.comThe Associated Presslast_img read more

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first_imgTAYLOR, B.C. – The District of Taylor has taken the next step with the Parcel Z and the Pine West Avenue construction projects.Parcel Z is a planned 50 unit subdivision on Taylor’s west side that was approved by Council in late January. The District rezoned that section of land to low-density residential in order to build the subdivision. The District intends to sell each lot over a ten-year period at roughly $91,000 per lot. They can now draft a bylaw to borrow from $4.2 million for design, engineering and service for the area with roads and utilities. The bylaw is pending provincial approval before Council seeks public approval.Currently, the project is in the preliminary stage where Council is seeing if there is any interest from companies for the design and construction of the project. The design concept, which will cost roughly $190,500, includes shallow and deep underground utilities, road design and property line layout for construction. “We need a design before we can get a tender,” said Mayor Rob Fraser. “If we want a tender for this year’s construction. We need to do it fairly soon. If they are done by March 31st can we get a tender by the summertime.”Additionally, the Pine West Avenue road and sewer project from 100th St. to the Spruce St. South intersection, would extend the current sewer system to service the subdivision. The drawings and the tender package for this project would cost $48,500 including initialization, permits, pipeline shifting and documents.“They have come up with a schedule to begin next week if tendered the project by tonight [Monday],” said Director of Operations Ryan Nelson. “With the design draw completed by March 31st.”Council is wanting to do these two projects at the same time so the newly built road construction is not dug up if the subdivision proceeds.Council passed a resolution to award the contract of the tender package of Parcel Z and the Pine Avenue West road and sewer projects to Urban Systems.The next step for the District will be to draft a Request for Proposal that will be presented to the Contract Administration and Building Contractor which will go out for bidding.last_img read more

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first_imgConway said that crews and equipment will be working to do maintenance on draining and ditching near the viewpoint’s parking lot and viewing areas after a drain became clogged during last week’s rainstorm.He explained that there was some localized water pooling in the viewpoint and some localized erosion near the viewing scopes at the south end of the viewpoint.Conway said that local tourism authorities including the Fort St. John Visitor Information Centre and BC Hydro’s W.A.C. Bennett Dam Visitor Centre have both been made aware of the issue.He added that BC Hydro will be notifying the public once the maintenance work has been completed and the viewpoint reopens. UPDATE: BC Hydro spokesperson Dave Conway said in an update that the drainage issues at the Site C Viewpoint were caused by a drain that was clogged during the rain event late last week.FORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – Anyone wanting to get a good look at the construction work being done in building the Site C Dam will have to wait a couple of weeks after BC Hydro closed the viewpoint overlooking the project.BC Hydro Site C project Community Relations Manager Dave Conway says that the Site C viewpoint has been temporarily closed for roughly the next two weeks so that crews can address a maintenance issue.last_img read more

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